Terms and Sessions of Congress

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A Table Showing the Terms of Congress from 1789 to Present

TCNTOC.com or TermsofCongress.com

Also see

 

Coming to terms! by Henry Robinson, Library of Congress LC-USZ62-62674

Coming to terms! by Henry Robinson, Library of Congress LC-USZ62-62674

The United States Congress consists of two separate legislative bodies: the House of Representatives and the Senate. Jointly these two separate legislative bodies are referred to as “Congress”. In some documents and usage, these two separate bodies are referred to as “the two Houses of Congress” or “both houses of Congress”. When referring to both bodies, we prefer to use “chamber” rather than “house”, thus, “two chambers of Congress” or “both chambers of Congress”. Also see “A Note About Usage: ‘Congress’“.

At the national level there is only one legislative body formally known as the “House” and that is the U.S. House of Representatives. Currently the House has 435 members, and its members are called “Representative” (Rep.) or, colloquially, “Congressman” or “Congresswoman”. Currently, there are 100 members of the U.S. Senate, and each member is called “Senator”. For the major differences between the House and the Senate, see CongressNumbers.com.

A “term of Congress” or “a Congress” lasts for two years, and begins on January 3 of each odd-numbered year. A “session of Congress” is generally one year long, and is the period during which Congress assembles and carries on its regular business. Each Congress generally has two regular sessions (which are referred to as “1st” (I) or “2nd” (II)), based on the constitutional mandate in Article. I. Section. 4. that Congress assemble at least once each year. The Clerk of the House has a list of all session dates of Congress as part of House History. Also available: table showing all sessions of Congress for the 1st Congress through the 112th Congress (through September 15, 2011) as an 18-page PDFPDF.

Being “in session” refers to when Congress is meeting during the session. The Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970 requires Congress to adjourn sine die no later than July 31 of each year unless there is a declared war, or unless Congress otherwise provides. In odd-numbered years, the Congress must take an August recess if it fails to adjourn by July 31. Since 1934, the first session of a Congress convenes on January 3 of odd-numbered years. Generally speaking, today the first session of a Congress concludes in November or December of that odd-numbered year, and the second session of a Congress begins in January of each even-numbered year and concludes in November or December of that even-numbered year (or as late as January 3 of of the following odd-numbered year, when the next Congress is seated).

Neither the House nor the Senate may adjourn for more than three days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays) without the concurrence of the other chamber.

Also see Congressional Election Information; Mid-Term Election; Reapportionment / Redistricting; Senate Classes: Terms of Service; Chapter Two, Pressures on Congress: Campaigns and Elections, § 5.10 Members of Congress: Service, Qualifications, Characteristics, and Filling Vacant Seats, in Congressional Deskbook.

For federal holidays, see OPM.

Terms of Congress
(links to Wikipedia – also see
Congressional Deskbook, § 5.31)
Congress
Years
Congress
Years
Congress
Years
Congress of the Confederation
March 1, 1781 – March 4, 1789
50th
March 4, 1887 – March 3, 1889
100th
January 3, 1987 – January 3, 1989
1st
March 4, 1789 – March 3, 1791
51st
March 4, 1889 – March 3, 1891
101st
January 3, 1989 – January 3, 1991
2nd
March 4, 1791 – March 3, 1793
52nd
March 4, 1891 – March 3, 1893
102nd
January 3, 1991 – January 3, 1993
3rd
March 4, 1793 – March 3, 1795
53rd
March 4, 1893 – March 3, 1895
103rd
January 3, 1993 – January 3, 1995
4th
March 4, 1795 – March 3, 1797
54th
March 4, 1895 – March 3, 1897
104th
January 3, 1995 – January 3, 1997
5th
March 4, 1797 – March 3, 1799
55th
March 4, 1897 – March 3, 1899
105th
January 3, 1997 – January 3, 1999
6th
March 4, 1799 – March 3, 1801
56th
March 4, 1899 – March 3, 1901
106th
January 3, 1999 – January 3, 2001
7th
March 4, 1801 – March 3, 1803
57th
March 4, 1901 – March 3, 1903
107th
January 3, 2001 – January 3, 2003
8th
March 4, 1803 – March 3, 1805
58th
March 4, 1903 – March 3, 1905
108th
January 3, 2003 – January 3, 2005
9th
March 4, 1805 – March 3, 1807
59th
March 4, 1905 – March 3, 1907
109th
January 3, 2005 – January 3, 2007
10th
March 4, 1807 – March 3, 1809
60th
March 4, 1907 – March 3, 1909
110th
January 3, 2007 – January 3, 2009
11th
March 4, 1809 – March 3, 1811
61st
March 4, 1909 – March 3, 1911
111th
January 3, 2009 – January 3, 2011
12th
March 4, 1811 – March 3, 1813
62nd
March 4, 1911 – March 3, 1913
112th
January 3, 2011 – January 3, 2013
13th
March 4, 1813 – March 3, 1815
63rd
March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1915
113th
January 3, 2013 – January 3, 2015
14th
March 4, 1815 – March 3, 1817
64th
March 4, 1915 – March 3, 1917
114th
January 3, 2015 – January 3, 2017
15th
March 4, 1817 – March 3, 1819
65th
March 4, 1917 – March 3, 1919
115th
January 3, 2017, to January 3, 2019
16th
March 4, 1819 – March 3, 1821
66th
March 4, 1919 – March 3, 1921
116th
2019-2021
17th
March 4, 1821 – March 3, 1823
67th
March 4, 1921 – March 3, 1923
117th
2021-2023
18th
March 4, 1823 – March 3, 1825
68th
March 4, 1923 – March 3, 1925
118th
2023-2025
19th
March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1827
69th
March 4, 1925 – March 3, 1927
119th
2025-2027
20th
March 4, 1827 – March 3, 1829
70th
March 4, 1927 – March 3, 1929
120th
2027-2029
21st
March 4, 1829 – March 3, 1831
71st
March 4, 1929 – March 3, 1931
121st
2029-2031
22nd
March 4, 1831 – March 3, 1833
72nd
March 4, 1931 – March 3, 1933
122nd
2031-2033
23rd
March 4, 1833 – March 3, 1835
73rd
March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1935
123rd
2033-2035
24th
March 4, 1835 – March 3, 1837
74th
January 3, 1935 – January 3, 1937
124th
2035-2037
25th
March 4, 1837 – March 3, 1839
75th
January 3, 1937 – January 3, 1939
125th
2037-2039
26th
March 4, 1839 – March 3, 1841
76th
January 3, 1939 – January 3, 1941
126th
2039-2041
27th
March 4, 1841 – March 3, 1843
77th
January 3, 1941 – December 16, 1942
127th
2041-2043
28th
March 4, 1843 – March 3, 1845
78th
January 3, 1943 – December 19, 1944
128th
2043-2045
29th
March 4, 1845 – March 3, 1847
79th
January 3, 1945 – January 3, 1947
129th
2045-2047
30th
March 4, 1847 – March 3, 1849
80th
January 3, 1947 – January 3, 1949
130th
2047-2049
31st
March 4, 1849 – March 3, 1851
81st
January 3, 1949 – January 3, 1951
131st
2049-2051
32nd
March 4, 1851 – March 3, 1853
82nd
January 3, 1951 – January 3, 1953
132nd
2051-2053
33rd
March 4, 1853 – March 3, 1855
83rd
January 3, 1953 – January 3, 1955
133rd
2053-2055
34th
March 4, 1855 – March 3, 1857
84th
January 3, 1955 – January 3, 1957
134th
2055-2057
35th
March 4, 1857 – March 3, 1859
85th
January 3, 1957 – January 3, 1959
135th
2057-2059
36th
March 4, 1859 – March 3, 1861
86th
January 3, 1959 – January 3, 1961
136th
2059-2061
37th
March 4, 1861 – March 3, 1863
87th
January 3, 1961 – January 3, 1963
137th
2061-2063
38th
March 4, 1863 – March 3, 1865
88th
January 3, 1963 – January 3, 1965
138th
2063-2065
39th
March 4, 1865 – March 3, 1867
89th
January 3, 1965 – January 3, 1967
139th
2065-2067
40th
March 4, 1867 – March 3, 1869
90th
January 3, 1967 – January 3, 1969
140th
2067-2069
41st
March 4, 1869 – March 3, 1871
91st
January 3, 1969 – January 3, 1971
141st
2069-2071
42nd
March 4, 1871 – March 3, 1873
92nd
January 3, 1971 – January 3, 1973
142nd
2071-2073
43rd
March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1875
93rd
January 3, 1973 – January 3, 1975
143rd
2073-2075
44th
March 4, 1875 – March 3, 1877
94th
January 3, 1975 – January 3, 1977
144th
2075-2077
45th
March 4, 1877 – March 3, 1879
95th
January 3, 1977 – January 3, 1979
145th
2077-2079
46th
March 4, 1879 – March 3, 1881
96th
January 3, 1979 – January 3, 1981
146th
2079-2081
47th
March 4, 1881 – March 3, 1883
97th
January 3, 1981 – January 3, 1983
147th
2081-2083
48th
March 4, 1883 – March 3, 1885
98th
January 3, 1983 – January 3, 1985
148th
2083-2085
49th
March 4, 1885 – March 3, 1887
99th
January 3, 1985 – January 3, 1987
149th
2085-2087

 

See Congressional Deskbook, § 5.21

For a table showing party control of the 80th through the 111th Congresses, see the Congressional Deskbook, § 5.41.

 


 

 

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URLs: TCNTOC.com
TermsofCongress.com

 

 






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