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Congress Seating Charts

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The information below is from the Congressional Deskbook 6th Edition (§ 11.11 and § 11.21).

  House of Representatives Floor Plan

Unlike the Members of the Senate, Members of the House have no assigned seats but are by tradition divided by party; Members of the Democratic Party sit to the Speaker's right and Members of the Republican Party sit to the Speaker's left.

In addition to the representatives (and formerly pages), a variety of staff have permanent or temporary privileges to be on the floor of the House. Standing next to or near the presiding officer are the parliamentarian, sergeant at arms, and clerk of the House. At the desk immediately in front of the Speaker are seated the journal clerk, tally clerk, and reading clerk. At the desk below the clerks are the bill clerk, enrolling clerk, and daily digest clerk. Reporters of debate sit at a table below the rostrum. Staff members of committees and individual representatives are allowed on the floor by unanimous consent.

§ 6.113, Who Is Allowed on the House Floor? in the Congressional Deskbook

  Senate Seating Chart

Seats are assigned in the Senate. Senators of the Democratic Party sit to the presiding officer's right, and Senators of the Republican Party sit to the presiding officer's left.

In addition to senators, a variety of staff have permanent or temporary privileges to be on the floor of the Senate. At the desk immediately in front of the presiding officer are seated the parliamentarian, legislative clerk, journal clerk, and, often, the executive clerk and bill clerk. Reporters of debates sit at a table below the rostrum. Seats near the rostrum are reserved for the secretary and assistant secretary of the Senate and the sergeant at arms. Majority- and minority-party secretaries and other staff members who have floor privileges may be seen on the floor. Pages sit on either side of the presiding officer’s desk. Staff members of individual senators are allowed on the floor by unanimous consent.
§ 6.192, Who Is Allowed on the Senate Floor? in the Congressional Deskbook

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