Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, and the Renaissance of Venetian Painting

Titian, Pastoral Concert (Concert Champêtre), c. 1510, oil on canvas
Titian, Pastoral Concert (“Concert Champêtre”), c. 1510, oil on canvas

This show was 13 years in the making. Visually seductive and rich with exciting ideas, it is one that visitors will long savor.

Show reveals relationships,” by Sheila Wickouski, The (Fredericksburg) Free-Lance Star, July 27, 2006

A major new international exhibition, Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, and the Renaissance of Venetian Painting, will present more than 50 masterpieces from the most exciting period of the Renaissance in Venice. Premiering June 18 through September 17 at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, the exhibition explores the relationships between these and other artists, emphasizes their innovative treatments of new pictorial themes such as the pastoral landscape, and reveals what modern conservation science has discovered about the Venetian painters’ techniques.
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The time span covered by the exhibition represents, visually and intellectually, the most exciting phase of the Renaissance in Venice, when the old Giovanni Bellini (d. 1516), Giorgione (d. 1510), and the young Titian, among others, were all working side by side. The exhibition will present approximately 60 paintings that best exemplify the new ideas and ideals: music, the pastoral landscape, the female nude, and the romantic portrait. It will include Bellini and Titian’s Feast of the Gods (1514 and 1529), Giorgione’s Adoration of the Shepherds (c. 1500), Laura (1506), and Three Philosophers (c. 1506).

Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, and the Renaissance of Venetian Painting, an exhibition at the National Gallery of Art, June 18 – September 17, 2006, West Building, Main Floor. Mondays through Saturdays, 10 am – 5 pm, Sundays 11 am – 6 pm.
The National Gallery of Art is located on the National Mall between Third and Seventh Streets at Constitution Avenue, NW. The West Building is at 6th Street NW at Constitution Avenue NW , Washington, DC. The nearest Metro stops are Judiciary Square on the Red Line, Archives-Navy Memorial-Penn Square on the Yellow and Green Lines, and Smithsonian on the Blue and Orange Lines.
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1 Comment on "Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, and the Renaissance of Venetian Painting"

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  1. markwolk says:

    The Pastoral Concert is a work from Titian’s youth. It appears Titian wanted the contrast of two worlds: aristocracy and nymphs and shepherds. Protagonists do not talk: they communicate through music.