The Presidential Budget Process

Title III of the Congressional Budget Act requires that the President submit his proposed budget to Congress no later than the first Monday in February. The President’s budget is actually only a request made to Congress, and Congress is under no obligation to adopt the budget or consider the recommendations of the President. photo credit: … Read more

The President’s Budget

This course, held each year in mid-February, focuses on the President’s next fiscal year budget proposal released in early February. Our faculty discuss the policy initiatives of the President and how Congress will respond to them. photo credit: thelastminute Attendees participate in a comprehensive overview and analysis of the President’s most current budget, Congressional response, … Read more

War Power and Military Establishment Clauses – Article I Section 8, Clauses 11, 12, 13 and 14 of the Constitution

The United States Constitution The War and Military Establishment Clauses are among Congress’ enumerated powers found in the Constitution of the United States, Article. I. Section. 8., clauses 11, 12, 13, and 14:     Obama’s Unprecedented War Powers Claims     (Clause 11 – War power) [The Congress shall have Power] To declare War, … Read more

A Guide to Understanding the Presidential Budget

See President’s Budget (CongressionalGlossary.com) The president’s budget, officially known as the Budget of the United States Government, is required by law to be submitted “On or after the first Monday in January but not later than the first Monday in February of each year.” (31 USC 1105). The budget contains estimates for spending as well … Read more

Fiscal and Monetary Powers – Article I Section 8, Clause 5 and 6 of the Constitution

The United States Constitution The Fiscal and Monetary Powers Clause are two of Congress’ enumerated powers found in the Constitution of the United States, Article. I. Section. 8., clause 5 and clause 6: (Clause 5 – Money) [The Congress shall have Power] To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix … Read more

Borrowing Power – Article I Section 8, Clause 2 of the Constitution

The United States Constitution The Borrowing Clause is one of Congress’ enumerated powers found in the Constitution of the United States, Article. I. Section. 8., clause 2: (Clause 2 – Borrowing power) [The Congress shall have Power] To borrow Money on the credit of the United States;       Deficits & Debts: Crash Course … Read more

The Commerce Clause – Article I Section 8, Clause 3 of the Constitution

The United States Constitution The Commerce Clause is one of Congress’ enumerated powers found in the Constitution of the United States, Article. I. Section. 8., clause 3: (Clause 3 – Commerce power) [The Congress shall have Power] To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes;   The … Read more

Direct Spending / Mandatory Spending (CongressionalGlossary.com)

From the Congressional Glossary – Including Legislative and Budget Terms Direct Spending / Mandatory Spending: Budget authority, and the resulting outlays, provided in laws other than appropriations acts. Spending controlled outside of annual appropriations acts, specifically including the Food Stamp (now SNAP) program; also referred to as mandatory spending. As defined by the Balanced Budget … Read more

The Constitution of the United States, Article. I. Section. 7. Revenue Bills, Legislative Process, Presidential Veto

The United States Constitution Article. I. (The Legislative Branch) Section. 7. (Revenue Bills, Legislative Process, Presidential Veto) All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with Amendments as on other Bills. Every Bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate, … Read more

Omnibus Bill (CongressionalGlossary.com)

From the Congressional Glossary – Including Legislative and Budget Terms Omnibus Bill: A measure that combines the provisions related to several disparate subjects into a single measure. Examples include continuing appropriations resolutions that might contain two or more of the twelve annual appropriations bills. See the 12 Subcommittees of the House Committee on Appropriations. The … Read more