Tag: revolving door

Crony Capitalism / Rent-Seeking / Corporate Welfare / Revolving Door (CongressionalGlossary.com)

Crony Capitalism / Rent-Seeking / Corporate Welfare / Revolving Door (CongressionalGlossary.com)

Crony Capitalism / Rent-Seeking / Corporate Welfare / Revolving Door Corporate welfare refers to subsidies and regulatory protections that lawmakers confer on certain businesses and industries. When considering budget issues, federal policymakers are supposed to have the broad public interest in mind. Unfortunately, that is not how the federal budget process usually works in practice. […]

Campaigns and Elections: Heaven and Hell Edition

Campaigns and Elections: Heaven and Hell Edition

  “Hell Bent for Election” (1944)   While walking down the street one day a U.S. Senator is tragically hit by a truck and dies. His soul arrives in heaven and is met by St. Peter at the entrance. “Welcome to heaven,” says St. Peter. “Before you settle in, it seems there is a problem. […]

Posted in: Congress, Humor
Congressional Ethics (CongressionalGlossary.com)

Congressional Ethics (CongressionalGlossary.com)

From the Congressional Glossary – Including Legislative and Budget Terms Congressional Ethics   Panel Hits Rangel With 13 Ethics Charges   A member of Congress works in an environment with numerous ethical rules, and with constraints on official, political, and personal activities. These limits exist in laws, regulations, chamber rules, interpretations, and practices. The expectations […]

Lobby / Lobbying (CongressionalGlossary.com)

Lobby / Lobbying (CongressionalGlossary.com)

From the Congressional Glossary – Including Legislative and Budget Terms Lobby / Lobbying A group seeking to influence the passage or defeat of legislation. Originally the term referred to persons frequenting the lobbies or corridors of legislative chambers to speak to lawmakers. The definition of a lobby and the activity of lobbying is a matter […]

K Street / Gucci Gulch (CongressionalGlossary.com)

K Street / Gucci Gulch (CongressionalGlossary.com)

From the Congressional Glossary – Including Legislative and Budget Terms K Street / Gucci Gulch Colloquialisms for Washington, DC, lobbyists. K Street is taken from K Street NW in Washington, DC, where many lobbying firms are located. K Street is definitely “inside the Beltway.” Pork Party House: Where DC insiders go for taxpayer-subsidized fun Gucci […]

A Note About Usage: “Congress” (CongressionalGlossary.com)

A Note About Usage: “Congress” (CongressionalGlossary.com)

From the Congressional Glossary – Including Legislative and Budget Terms The United States Congress consists of two separate legislative bodies: the House of Representatives and the Senate. Jointly these two separate legislative bodies are referred to as “Congress”. Congress meets in the United States Capitol building. Congress, n. A body of men who meet to […]

Agency Mission (CongressionalGlossary.com)

Agency Mission (CongressionalGlossary.com)

From the Congressional Glossary – Including Legislative and Budget Terms Agency Mission photo credit: IntelFreePress Agency Mission: Term used in section 1105(a)(22) of title 31 of the United States Code, which outlines content requirements for the President’s budget submission to Congress. Section 1105 requires that the President’s budget contain a statement of agency budget authority […]

“The seven stages of the office seeker”

“The seven stages of the office seeker”

“The seven stages of the office seeker,” by Edward Williams Clay (artist) and John Childs (lithographer). Image and text from the Library of Congress: A satire on patronage and corruption in New York State politics, based on the medieval theme, perpetuated in American folk art, of the “life and ages of man.” Here the seven […]

Congressional Pay: Lower pay means more corruption?

Congressional Pay: Lower pay means more corruption?

Too much money in politics or too much politics in money? “Hush money–or money for the sewer,” by Frank Beard, Judge V. 5, March 1, 1884, pages 8-9.From Library of CongressFrank Beard (1842-1905). | Interview (1895) First, let me point out that congressional salaries already put members of Congress in the top 5%. So it’s […]